15 responses

  1. Nikita
    August 26, 2014

    I’m currently living in Prague, and I disagree with the statement that the locals are too depressing. In fact, most of the Czech people I meet are quick to smile and offer help (outside of those in law enforcement, but I feel like that’s the case everywhere) and I’ve made some very close Czech friends. Also, there are a lot of expats here, so finding other English speakers wouldn’t be a problem.
    But, Romania also sounds amazing, as does the possibility of not worrying about visas. So it is quite a conundrum.

    Reply

    • Talon Windwalker
      August 26, 2014

      I agree. For the most part I’ve found Czech people to be very friendly and nice. They aren’t necessarily warm, but the culture is one where people kind of stick to their own business unless someone speaks to them.

      There are plenty of English-speaking adults, but not teenagers in Prague.

      Romania is absolutely wonderful, although I like Prague more. But Prague is more accepting of gays.

      Reply

  2. Carolyn Sasek
    August 25, 2014

    Enjoyable post… we have considerations in the direction of moving out of the US as well… I’m hoping it can work out for us to cross paths when you’re in the US this time. Blessings to you and Tigger as your opportunities and options unfold. 🙂

    Reply

    • Talon Windwalker
      August 26, 2014

      Thanks! It would be nice if we could meet.

      Reply

  3. Mary
    August 25, 2014

    As you know we are also struggling with the same type of conundrum talon. Wait and see how you feel in the us, particularly Washington. I was completely against living in mainland USA but the benefits are eroding away all the cons at the moment. There is a lot to consider but the visa issue coupled with the fact that at the end of the day we feel like we will never fully belong in another country is pulling us to the us mainland. Our goal is to build a life with pets, gardens, friends so why not try that where our tribe already is?? Something to consider:). Plus if we are going to be there it’s a no brainer right?!

    Reply

    • Talon Windwalker
      August 26, 2014

      That feeling of not belonging can be a big one. I’m definitely a bit tired of having to deal with visas, and I don’t enjoy the pressure of HAVING to go somewhere every few months just to renew a visa, etc. Then you have to worry about trying to reenter and having someone who is in a bad mood or whatever.

      As far as you guys being there, I’ll believe it when I see you stepping off a plane. LOL

      Reply

  4. Lance
    August 25, 2014

    Lots of options in the world! When we were in Prague last year, we encountered a group from the International School out for a romp in the old city. So I know there are international English speaks kids for Tigger there. Something to think on. Good luck with your decision.

    Reply

    • Talon Windwalker
      August 26, 2014

      The problem is connecting with those kids and building friendships with them outside of school. This has been our friend’s challenge, and they’ve lived there for at least 3 years.

      Reply

  5. Meggie Kay
    August 25, 2014

    I can foresee myself having the same dilemma one day. Thankfully, I’m not ready to settle down yet and still have a long list of places I want to test out so my decision is far in the future. I’m sure you’ll figure out something that works for both of you. Good luck. 🙂

    Reply

    • Talon Windwalker
      August 26, 2014

      Yeah, if it was just me the list would be a lot easier to deal with. lol

      Reply

  6. Lauren Bassart
    August 25, 2014

    We are fighting with this same predicament at the moment. We are only in the US of A because of Zoe (our dog), but she is 12 and won’t be around forever. I don’t foresee us stay here after she passes. We will most likely home base out of Trinidad where my family is and the cost of living is a fraction of what it is here in the States.

    Reply

    • Talon Windwalker
      August 26, 2014

      Trinidad? Wow! That would be a big change.

      Reply

  7. Izy Berry – The Wrong Way Home
    August 25, 2014

    As someone who spent 6 months living in the Czech Republic, I would say go elsewhere. While I loved my experience, loved Prague and a lot of the smaller towns etc, the locals are quite depressing and it can be hard to make a good circle of Czech friends. I think Romania sounds like a better option for you, the best out of any, and you can always visit Prague. Czech is very, very hard to learn and almost pointless to learn. I tried to learn some, but would constantly be replied to, especially in Prague, in English. How could I learn if no one would entertain my minor errors?

    Reply

    • Talon Windwalker
      August 26, 2014

      We had a very different experience. I didn’t find Czechs to be depressing at all. And whenever I would use what little Czech I knew, they were always very happy and tried to help me correct a pronunciation or learn a new word.

      Reply

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