14 responses

  1. Andreea
    May 15, 2017

    How do you think someone could “be him/her-self” in a place where they get physically and socially punished for it? How do you think they should go about it? What kind of effect do you think it has on their mental health?

    Reply

    • Talon Windwalker
      May 16, 2017

      Hiding your self also poses harm to one’s mental health. When physical safety is at risk, that’s a different story, but often our fear is really misplaced.

      Reply

  2. Dale
    March 20, 2015

    Such a tragic shame that someone feels the need to wear a different mask to conceal who they really are and how they feel. When I consider the idea of holding back my thoughts on something makes me feel uneasy just for a few seconds. The idea of doing so for hours, days, weeks, months, or years upsets me.

    There are times when I see Western Europe and how more open people can be and the pride that communities are discovering inside of themselves for their LGBT communities, but then I know that just a few hundred KM in a different direction people are being persecuted in all matters of their lives because of how their feelings towards members of the same sex don’t match those of the bullies in our communities.

    It makes me sad. It makes me rage. But rage doesn’t help. What helps is to be open, and the first who are most open are the pioneers that we must support the most. It’s the pioneers of the LGBT community of the past 30 years in the US that have lifted LGBT rights so high into the public agenda, it’s now our turn to help today’s pioneers.

    I hope your new friend finds the courage to be someone we can all stand behind.

    Reply

    • Talon Windwalker
      March 28, 2015

      It is incredibly sad. I so much appreciate all the great work being done by allies as well. It all helps tremendously!

      Reply

  3. Sam
    March 19, 2015

    I cannot imagine dating someone who was closeted – I would have absolutely zero patience for it, and I think it would actually make me really down. I’m a very open person, and make no attempt at hiding anything about myself (indeed this sometimes leads to oversharing) and I think I would find it exhausting trying to go into the closet with/for someone else. I admire you for your patience and respect in this regard, Talon! Good luck!

    Reply

    • Talon Windwalker
      March 28, 2015

      I used to think I would be able to, but in reality I just can’t live that life. Well, I refuse to really.

      Reply

  4. Vicky
    March 19, 2015

    Maybe this person has come into your life so you can be his guide to closetless living. It is really sad that we are not able to jump into someones skin and experience those things as they do/have. How interesting would it be to swap genders for a week or more, change skin color/tone, and on and on. It is one thing to hear about it but to actually experience it would give a whole new level of understanding.

    Reply

    • Talon Windwalker
      March 28, 2015

      Getting a taste of someone else’s life is one of the things I love about travel. It really expands your world.

      Reply

  5. Arianwen
    March 19, 2015

    Well said! Life is too short and if anyone doesn’t accept you for who you are then that really is their loss!

    Reply

    • Talon Windwalker
      March 28, 2015

      Definitely. It’s tragic, though, that so many people can’t accept themselves.

      Reply

  6. Estelle
    March 18, 2015

    Religious and political prisons can be just as confining because if you are not the religion or political flavor of the moment, then you will probably be hurt. Not so much physically as emotionally and even spiritually. Sometimes you don’t get an opportunity to branch out of the box to share what you DO have in common with that fellow person who believes so differently than you, but do they really? I have gotten to where I often don’t care to find out.

    Reply

    • Talon Windwalker
      March 28, 2015

      Yep, there are so many kinds of prisons we often build and maintain for ourselves. Really quite sad.

      Reply

  7. Erick
    March 18, 2015

    WOW man. I think we tend to forget about the scares we still carry from social stigmas we grew up in. Growing up as a black man in the US tends to have certain “rules” that determine who you are and what you’re going to be. For me, the hardest thing I have to do is stop carrying about being “black” enough. What if “my people” don’t like the way I worded something? It’s difficult to get out of these self imposed prisons no matter how strong and confident we are.

    Reply

    • Talon Windwalker
      March 18, 2015

      Great example. Some of my Native American friends deal with this, too. I know a few who have been called an apple (red on the outside, white on the inside) for similar reasons. Sometimes we aren’t even aware.

      Reply

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