16 responses

  1. Micki
    June 6, 2014

    I can definitely sympathize with having to put aside our feelings about how something will look to give our kids some freedom to express themselves. This morning my lovely little five year old girl decided to dress her self. She was incredibly proud when she showed me her outfit – hot pink leggings, a bright paisley T-shirt, all under a striped sundress, and topped off with her brother’s hand me down Ben 10 running shoes and pink socks. So she went to school dressed that way, proud as anything.

    I’m going to shamelessly steal your “This is a safety issue” shortcut. Brilliant.

    Reply

    • Talon Windwalker
      June 9, 2014

      That sounds like quite the outfit. Did you get a picture?

      The safety issue thing has really helped. I haven’t had to use it too often, but there have been a few times, and it’s been great. He knows I’ll explain things as soon as we have the luxury of time.

      Reply

  2. Tracey
    May 29, 2014

    Oh, my son Makai is such a free spirit. He has always been so and I love that. I want to preserve his freedom to be him but I need to get over my own limitations to do so.

    I have been experiencing his outward vagabond behavior in a foreign country for 36 days now and in the beginning it was quite stressful. We are in a country where we all, especially Mak(because he is blond and blue eyed)are looked at because we simply look different.
    I had to give myself a kick. We chose to travel with our son to affirm freedom to choose and to be free to just be,really.

    I can totally identify with your struggles, they are mine too.For me, success comes down to not caring what others think of Makai’s behavior but focusing on what his opinion or feeling is on his experiences or actions on a particular day. If he had a great day and was safe and respectful(as much as his age allows without direction from me) it was a great day no matter the opinions of others.

    Reply

    • Talon Windwalker
      May 29, 2014

      It’s so great you’re creating so much space for him to be able to be himself. It can be so difficult to not be concerned about what other people think about our children’s choices and actions. So much more important to focus on the big things like respect, as you mentioned.

      Reply

  3. Francesca (@WorkMomTravels)
    May 28, 2014

    My parents weren’t TOO concerned about what others thought, but plenty of my friends’ parents were. Do you think it’s just part of their generation? I try to be a bit more open-minded with my children but pressure from societal “norms” causes me great anxiety. That being said, I doubt myself as a parent daily, as well. I guess it’s normal for any conscientious, responsible adult with children to have such thoughts. At the same time, I attempt to foster my daughter’s creativity and ideas (my son is not even 1 yet) that she often exhibits when we’re traveling. More inspiration for me to hit the road with the family as often as possible 🙂

    Reply

    • Talon Windwalker
      May 29, 2014

      I definitely think a lot of it is generational. My grandparents were even worse about it. They were always so very concerned about what the neighbors might think. It sometimes is difficult to ignore those other voices, but it’s so important we do.

      Reply

  4. RG
    May 28, 2014

    It’s certainly a fine balance between developing their individuality and guiding them into decisions that won’t carry negative consequences… We try to allow natural consequences to teach, but I think communication with children is severely underrated or utilised. When we take the time to talk to and listen to our 10.5 yo son we are always amazed at his clarity and wisdom. Well done on not letting your ego parent. 🙂

    Reply

    • Talon Windwalker
      May 29, 2014

      Natural consequences are a much better teacher than a nagging parent for sure. And you are so right. So many issues can be avoided or weakened if people will just communicate with their kids. Their insight is so valuable.

      Reply

  5. Dyanne@TravelnLass
    May 28, 2014

    Most wise and thoughtful, Talon. And to be sure: “There are times when you doubt yourself as a parent.”

    But the bottom line is – no matter how hard we try to be the very best parent, we’re only human after all, and my parents, and your parents, and you, and I – we’ll most certainly make mistakes. We can never possibly be “perfect”. We all just do “the best we can”.

    Not an excuse for irresponsible parenting, but it seems a lot of kids have a hard time realizing that their parents aren’t/weren’t perfect, and they truly are doing/did the very best they could.

    Reply

    • Talon Windwalker
      May 29, 2014

      I think one of the things that helps with it is being willing to recognize your shortcomings to your child. Since I’m not afraid to admit when I’m wrong and apologize, he knows quite well how imperfect I really am. LOL

      Reply

  6. Jessie Voigts
    May 28, 2014

    LOVE, love, love this. Yes.

    Reply

    • Talon Windwalker
      May 29, 2014

      Thanks, Jessie!

      Reply

  7. Kristin Henning
    May 28, 2014

    Well said. It’s so easy to criticize other parenting styles. But from the outside, the observations are just little snapshots with no regard to how that moment or that day fits into the larger picture. Sounds like you manage an even keel.

    Reply

    • Talon Windwalker
      May 29, 2014

      And that larger picture can be so enormous!

      Reply

  8. Nick
    May 28, 2014

    Wow man! I’m really impressed by your parenting style, I don’t have kids myself but I think you’ve just about nailed it. Where can I vote for you as Father of Year!

    Reply

    • Talon Windwalker
      May 29, 2014

      Cheers for that!

      Reply

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