10 responses

  1. K Masur
    April 19, 2015

    “and every Mexican I’ve spoken to has agreed.”

    Were those mexicans the typical mexicans typically found abroad (i.e. from Mexico City, Guadalajara, etc.) and other southern regions? If yes, I’m not surprised at their opinion. They don’t even consider northern mexicans to be real mexicans at all, ha! Just so you can have an idea, they even ridicule the flour tortilla, a staple of northern mexican cuisine, especially Monterrey… So I suppose the nacho from our humble Piedras Negras doesn’t even stand a chance with them, lol. But if you wish to side with them southern mexicans, by all means…

    Reply

    • Talon Windwalker
      April 20, 2015

      As I said. We’ll need to agree to disagree.

      Reply

  2. K Masur
    April 19, 2015

    “sorry, but nachos and burritos are not really Mexican food”

    I don’t mean to get technical here, but while you are right with burritos, nachos ARE definitely a Mexican dish. They originally come from Piedras Negras, Coahuila, Mexico.

    Reply

    • Talon Windwalker
      April 19, 2015

      They were invented for Gringos. Noodles were invented in China, but that doesn’t make Spaghetti Chinese food. 😉

      Reply

      • K Masur
        April 19, 2015

        “They were invented for Gringos.”

        Yeah you’re right, the very first nachos happened to be made for some guest gringos while traveling in Mexico, but we have to consider that these guests didn’t even have a say as to the food they wanted…they just showed up at a wrong time in that Piedras Negras restaurant and demanded to be fed, lol. The father of the nacho, Piedras Negras chef Mr. Ignacio “Nacho” Anaya, did the best he could to come up with such dish without an ounce of influence from those gringos, so the fact that the end customers were gringos is actually irrelevant….the outcome would have been equally the same had the guests been local mexican patrons instead of the gringos.

        It is evident that the dish was heavily embraced as a local Piedras Negras dish as it not only became popular, but an annual nacho festival is held in that city to this day…

        Reply

      • Talon Windwalker
        April 19, 2015

        When I visited Piedras Negras, I never saw one place serving it, except for the obvious tourist targets. I stand by my opinion it isn’t Mexican food.

        Reply

      • K Masur
        April 19, 2015

        Sorry, but I actually come from the Eagle Pass/Piedras Negras border. And I can tell you the nacho is a source of pride in Piedras Negras. While you no doubt visited our region, I can tell you I actually grew up there and know the area quite well. And, incidentally, I have actually dined at the old Moderno Restaurant many times for their original nacho recipe. Our border is not exactly a touristy place per se as we’re not famous as Tijuana/San Diego or El Paso/Juarez, so we don’t really have “tourist traps” like what we see in those border cities or what we see here in Prague…the Mercado in Piedras being the closest thing that could be considered a trap.

        But anyways, last time I checked, Piedras Negras was actually still part of Mexico, and I suppose it still is…and if a local Piedras Negras resident invented a certain dish back in the 40s, I would say it is logical, if not obvious, that the nacho is a mexican invention, and therefore, mexican food.

        Next time you encounter a mexican from the north, especially from Coahuila, feel free to discuss the nacho with them. Btw, most Mexicans (from the south) are very ignorant about the north of Mexico, so chances are that they have never even heard of Piedras Negras or if they have, they couldn’t pinpoint it for you on a map. So I wouldn’t be surprised if they themselves are also ignorant of the nacho and its origin.

        Anyways, if in spite of all this you prefer to believe that the nacho comes from the USA, then I won’t interfere with that anymore 🙂

        Reply

      • Talon Windwalker
        April 19, 2015

        I never said they came from the USA. I said they aren’t Mexican food, and every Mexican I’ve spoken to has agreed. We’ll just have to agree to disagree.

        Reply

  3. Peter Korchnak @ Where Is Your Toothbrush?
    February 23, 2014

    In Prague I satisfy my food cravings with a big plate of vepro-knedlo-zelo and a couple of beers (I am from Slovakia). Anything else is an import. A couple of old-school restaurants in the Old Town area that retain their gritty, for-the-locals-only feel: Pivnice u Rudolfina on Krizovnicka Street and Pivnice u Milosrdnych, now closed down. Though last time I visited, in summer 2013, I felt they both had gone down from my previous visit.

    Reply

    • Talon Windwalker
      February 24, 2014

      I wouldn’t plan on finding anything truly local in the historic area. Like in many places, I think you have to get outside the area for that.

      Reply

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